Resource: Growing Your Greens

John Kohler is passionate about organic gardening, and this description may be a bit lacking. In fact, John is downright obsessed with finding ways to improve his crop yields in his Las Vegas urban farm (he was actually raided by police thinking he was growing marijuana) and his zeal jumps forth from his videos with conviction normally associated with the most ardent religious preachers. That said, we find almost every topic he covers relevant, even if his videos are a bit on the lengthy side, and John will eventually win you over with his sheer earnestness and honesty. Whether you want to start your first container garden, re-mineralize your soil, eliminate pests, or learn the benefits of different types of produce and how to properly compost, this is the resource to visit. So if you have a gardening question, visit him – now!

To visit Growing Your Greens, click here.

A Midsummer Day’s Dream

raised garden bed

Alicia seeds a garden box with carrot seeds before planting other vegetables in-between the rows.

By Ian Denchasy

After a very successful spring and summer planting season, it was time to revisit the “farm” in Our Urban Farm, cleaning out our various planter boxes, moving them to maximum exposure spots throughout our property, and finally dealing with the old backyard lawn we had allowed to die off over the past few months. It was a hard weekend worth of effort, but there’s just something magical about putting in a solid few hours of manual labor that will eventually pay in vegetable currency. Continue reading

See How One Couple Squeezes An Entire Farm Onto Their Small Los Angeles Property

By Carolyn Silveira (via Upworthy)

Erik and Kelly decided they’d rather grow their own artichokes than have to work at crummy jobs in order to buy them at the store. So naturally, they turned their urban house into a mini-farm.

I loved this home tour because it’s also a radical reminder of what “home economics” really means. Learn why they actually hate the idea of “self-sufficiency” at 2:00, hear about a time when everyone in L.A. had chickens at 6:00, and check out their exotic milk-crate toilet at 11:00.

Flying the Coop: Why urban farmers should do research before raising chickens

 

Robert Garrova/KPCC

From KPCC Radio, Los Angeles.

Keeping chickens in Los Angeles is really nothing new, but with the rise in popularity of “urban homesteading,” more and more Angelenos are deciding to raise chickens in their backyards. Continue reading

Welcome to our urban farm.

2012-12-12 13.51.45As in, literally, a project to turn our property into a living, breathing, working farm.

A few short years ago, we got tired to spending too much money at our local Whole Foods Market for healthy produce and watching our unquenchable lawns drink us into the poor house. At the urging of our good friend, Betty, we built a couple of planter boxes to attempt to grow some vegetables, converted our front yard to low water succulent plants, and tried our hand at shopping yard sales and thrift stores to find items on the cheap instead of paying retail at our local Target and Costco.

And while it hasn’t been easy, and we have yet to replace our trips to the grocery store, we have certainly gained much more than a few tomatoes, summer squash, and lower water bills. Our experience in cultivating our tiny, 120×40 foot Mar Vista property has brought us in touch with our land and given us appreciation for what’s been lost in the modern era of convenience, speed, and over stimulation brought about by our technology driven society. In fact, we’ve met hummingbirds that now regularly visit our plants for a drink of nectar, bees cruising through our lavender, worms toiling beneath our soil, and Monarch butterflies nesting in our milkweed as they migrate south. In early 2012, we welcomed our first chickens – Original, Extra Crispy, and McNugget – to our family and they’ve rewarded us with dozens of eggs and morning wake up calls no alarm clocks can match!

It is our hope that this site will bring as much, if not more, information and advice than we can dispense so that our urban farm can become even more productive in the years to come. Please do not hesitate to leave your comments, questions, and tips on this site and we welcome you to come and visit if you’re in our neighborhood and say hello to the hens, who now crave as much attention as most children.

Ian, Alicia, and Kealii
Urban Farmers, Mar Vista, CA